Angebote zu "Democracy" (107 Treffer)

Sharing Democracy
23,47 € *
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It is frequently assumed that the people must have something in common or else democracy will fail. This assumption that democracy requires commonality - such as a shared nationality, a common culture, or consensus on a core set of values - sets theorists and political actors alike on a futile search for what we have in common, and it generates misplaced anxiety when it turns out that this commonality is not forthcoming. In Sharing Democracy, Michaele Ferguson argues that this preoccupation with commonality misdirects our attention toward what we share and away from how we share in democracy. This produces an ironically anti-democratic tendency to emphasize the passive possession of commonality at the expense of promoting the active exercise of political freedom. Ferguson counteracts this tendency by exposing the reasons for the persistent allure of the common. She offers in its stead a radical vision of democracy grounded in political freedom: the capacity of ordinary people to make and remake the world in which they live. This vision of democracy is exemplified in protest marches: cacophonous, unpredictable, and self-authorizing collective enactments of our world-building freedom. Ferguson develops her radical vision of democracy by drawing on Hannah Arendts account of how we share a world in common with others, Ludwig Wittgensteins later philosophy of language, and Linda Zerillis critique of the essentialist/anti-essentialist debates in feminist theory. She juxtaposes critical readings of democratic theorists with readings of authors in related fields, such as Benedict Anderson, Robert Putnam, and Charles Taylor. Her theoretical argument is illustrated and informed by interpretations of political events, including the Arab Spring, the integration of Little Rock High School, debates over Quebec secession, immigrant rights protests in the US in 2006, and the Occupy movement.

Anbieter: Bol.de
Stand: 19.06.2017
Zum Angebot
Sharing Democracy
23,47 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It is frequently assumed that the people must have something in common or else democracy will fail. This assumption that democracy requires commonality - such as a shared nationality, a common culture, or consensus on a core set of values - sets theorists and political actors alike on a futile search for what we have in common, and it generates misplaced anxiety when it turns out that this commonality is not forthcoming. In Sharing Democracy, Michaele Ferguson argues that this preoccupation with commonality misdirects our attention toward what we share and away from how we share in democracy. This produces an ironically anti-democratic tendency to emphasize the passive possession of commonality at the expense of promoting the active exercise of political freedom. Ferguson counteracts this tendency by exposing the reasons for the persistent allure of the common. She offers in its stead a radical vision of democracy grounded in political freedom: the capacity of ordinary people to make and remake the world in which they live. This vision of democracy is exemplified in protest marches: cacophonous, unpredictable, and self-authorizing collective enactments of our world-building freedom. Ferguson develops her radical vision of democracy by drawing on Hannah Arendts account of how we share a world in common with others, Ludwig Wittgensteins later philosophy of language, and Linda Zerillis critique of the essentialist/anti-essentialist debates in feminist theory. She juxtaposes critical readings of democratic theorists with readings of authors in related fields, such as Benedict Anderson, Robert Putnam, and Charles Taylor. Her theoretical argument is illustrated and informed by interpretations of political events, including the Arab Spring, the integration of Little Rock High School, debates over Quebec secession, immigrant rights protests in the US in 2006, and the Occupy movement.

Anbieter: buch.de
Stand: 19.06.2017
Zum Angebot
Sharing Democracy
19,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It is frequently assumed that the ´´people´´ must have something in common or else democracy will fail. This assumption that democracy requires commonality - such as a shared nationality, a common culture, or consensus on a core set of values - sets theorists and political actors alike on a futile search for what we have in common, and it generates misplaced anxiety when it turns out that this commonality is not forthcoming. In Sharing Democracy, Michaele Ferguson argues that this preoccupation with commonality misdirects our attention toward what we share and away from how we share in democracy. This produces an ironically anti-democratic tendency to emphasize the passive possession of commonality at the expense of promoting the active exercise of political freedom. Ferguson counteracts this tendency by exposing the reasons for the persistent allure of the common. She offers in its stead a radical vision of democracy grounded in political freedom: the capacity of ordinary people to make and remake the world in which they live. This vision of democracy is exemplified in protest marches: cacophonous, unpredictable, and self-authorizing collective enactments of our world-building freedom. Ferguson develops her radical vision of democracy by drawing on Hannah Arendt´s account of how we share a world in common with others, Ludwig Wittgenstein´s later philosophy of language, and Linda Zerilli´s critique of the essentialist/anti-essentialist debates in feminist theory. She juxtaposes critical readings of democratic theorists with readings of authors in related fields, such as Benedict Anderson, Robert Putnam, and Charles Taylor. Her theoretical argument is illustrated and informed by interpretations of political events, including the Arab Spring, the integration of Little Rock High School, debates over Quebec secession, immigrant rights protests in the US in 2006, and the Occupy movement.

Anbieter: Bol.de
Stand: 03.06.2017
Zum Angebot
Sharing Democracy
19,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It is frequently assumed that the ´´people´´ must have something in common or else democracy will fail. This assumption that democracy requires commonality - such as a shared nationality, a common culture, or consensus on a core set of values - sets theorists and political actors alike on a futile search for what we have in common, and it generates misplaced anxiety when it turns out that this commonality is not forthcoming. In Sharing Democracy, Michaele Ferguson argues that this preoccupation with commonality misdirects our attention toward what we share and away from how we share in democracy. This produces an ironically anti-democratic tendency to emphasize the passive possession of commonality at the expense of promoting the active exercise of political freedom. Ferguson counteracts this tendency by exposing the reasons for the persistent allure of the common. She offers in its stead a radical vision of democracy grounded in political freedom: the capacity of ordinary people to make and remake the world in which they live. This vision of democracy is exemplified in protest marches: cacophonous, unpredictable, and self-authorizing collective enactments of our world-building freedom. Ferguson develops her radical vision of democracy by drawing on Hannah Arendt´s account of how we share a world in common with others, Ludwig Wittgenstein´s later philosophy of language, and Linda Zerilli´s critique of the essentialist/anti-essentialist debates in feminist theory. She juxtaposes critical readings of democratic theorists with readings of authors in related fields, such as Benedict Anderson, Robert Putnam, and Charles Taylor. Her theoretical argument is illustrated and informed by interpretations of political events, including the Arab Spring, the integration of Little Rock High School, debates over Quebec secession, immigrant rights protests in the US in 2006, and the Occupy movement.

Anbieter: buch.de
Stand: 03.06.2017
Zum Angebot
Constitutional Power-Sharing Democracy in Africa
59,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Elections in Africa have become a make or break exercise for states. Africa continues to witness intense power struggles resulting from ethnicity. Elections are used as a platform for parties that have been excluded from political participation and decision-making, to seek victory while the incumbents will do anything to stay in power. This leads to hotly contested elections that are often marred with electoral violence and rigging. In extreme cases incumbents change constitutions whereas some resort to dictatorship or military rule. My position is that unless there is genuine political and economic power-sharing in Africa through a formidable, inclusive process of constitutionalism, and participation by citizens, then power struggles and violence, will continue to plague the African continent. Power-sharing must ensure equal distribution of resources, separation and devolution of powers, proportional representation, adequate checks and balances on the executive and a fundamental change in the ideologies of citizens. I propose power-sharing through consociational democracy and argue for the formation of federal nation-states through regional integration.

Anbieter: buch.de
Stand: 07.05.2017
Zum Angebot
Constitutional Power-Sharing Democracy in Africa
59,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Elections in Africa have become a make or break exercise for states. Africa continues to witness intense power struggles resulting from ethnicity. Elections are used as a platform for parties that have been excluded from political participation and decision-making, to seek victory while the incumbents will do anything to stay in power. This leads to hotly contested elections that are often marred with electoral violence and rigging. In extreme cases incumbents change constitutions whereas some resort to dictatorship or military rule. My position is that unless there is genuine political and economic power-sharing in Africa through a formidable, inclusive process of constitutionalism, and participation by citizens, then power struggles and violence, will continue to plague the African continent. Power-sharing must ensure equal distribution of resources, separation and devolution of powers, proportional representation, adequate checks and balances on the executive and a fundamental change in the ideologies of citizens. I propose power-sharing through consociational democracy and argue for the formation of federal nation-states through regional integration.

Anbieter: Bol.de
Stand: 18.02.2017
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Sharing Democracy als eBook Download von Michae...
15,49 € *
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(15,49 € / in stock)

Sharing Democracy:ebook Ausgabe Michaele L. Ferguson

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 27.06.2017
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Constitutional Power-Sharing Democracy in Afric...
59,00 € *
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(59,00 € / in stock)

Constitutional Power-Sharing Democracy in Africa:The Concept of Power-Sharing In the Emergence of Coalition Governments in Africa: A Critical Analysis of Kenya´s Case Joseph Thomas MBoya Oburu SJ

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 26.06.2017
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From Power Sharing to Democracy als eBook Downl...
76,49 € *
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(76,49 € / in stock)

From Power Sharing to Democracy:Post-Conflict Institutions in Ethnically Divided Societies Sid Noel

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 27.06.2017
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Power-sharing in an Emerging Democracy: The Nig...
49,00 € *
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The politics of federalism emanated in Nigeria federal structure instituted in 1954 following acceptance of erstwhile Nigerian leaders to adopt the United States of America federal model as a political means to govern different ethnic groups amalgamated in 1914 by Lord Lugard. However, Nigerian leaders according to Dudley (1968) were ´´uncritically accepting the Wheare ´model´ of federalism´´. This ´´uncritical´´ thinking produced imbalance federal structure that made the Northern part of the country to be above others even when Eastern and Western parts of the country are put together. The North has quantumly benefited a lot from this imbalanced Nigerian state since its formation. The political imbalance was transferred to the post-colonial state where the Nigerians leaders further manipulated the socio-instruments to ensure hegemony and control of the Nigerian state by the North. The successive governments in the country both military and civil were from the North dominated the polity. The military intervention in politics in Nigeria further aggravated the notion of federal system and structure. The military rule through various decrees since 1969 increased the powers of the central

Anbieter: buch.de
Stand: 07.05.2017
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